fbpx
Loading...
Strictly Necessary Cookies

These cookies are required to enable core site functionality.

Yes
Functionality Cookies

Functionality cookies allow us to provide enhanced and more personalized content and features. In order to permit your connection our website, our servers receive and record information about your computer and browser, potentially including your IP address, browser type, and other software or hardware information. All of these features help us to improve your visit and assist in navigation of the sites’ features.

Analytics Cookies

We and our service providers may use analytics cookies, which are sometimes called performance cookies, to collect information about your use of our website, for instance, which pages you go to most. The information allows us to see the overall patterns of usage, help us record any difficulties users may have while using our website and can show us whether or not our advertising is effective.

Advertising And Targeting Cookies

We may use third party advertising and targeting cookies to correlate your use of our website to personal information obtained about you so that we may more clearly target the information we provide you to the specific items we think you will find interesting, based on your prior online activities and preferences. We also may use these cookies to deliver ads that we believe are relevant to you and your interests.

Project Expat
  • Project Expat
  • Jul 28, 2022

Renting a Flat in Germany: Step by Step

We are aware of the fact that renting a flat in Germany can be a challenge for everyone, especially for expats coming to the country. Documents, bureaucracy procedures, phone calls in a foreign language… It may all sound too much. But don’t worry – Project Expat is here to help you. We have created this article in order to assist you during all the steps that you need to follow if you want to rent a flat in Germany. Let’s dive right into it!

  1. What documents do I need to rent a flat in Germany?

First of all, if you’re coming to Germany as an expat, you should make sure that you have the right to stay in the country (that is, you are in possession of a residence permit, if applicable). If you want to rent a flat in the country, the first thing the landlord will ask for is your ID or passport. Afterwards, you must be able to prove that you can financially support yourself in the country and you can therefore pay your rent. Normally, you will have to provide your landlord with a salary slip or your bank statement to prove that you have enough income.

If you have already lived and rented a property in Germany before, you will need to provide the credit record documentation, also known as Schufa Record. This document tracks the debt that you may have, which is why landlords might ask for it.

Lastly, if you are unable to submit the aforementioned documentation, the landlord will ask you for the name of a guarantor. If you are unable to pay your rent for any reason, this person must formally agree to do so. However, this is not very common and possessing all the needed documents is usually a piece of cake!

  1. How do I look for a flat in Germany?

There are many options for expats who want to rent an apartment in Germany. Most people just use online renting webpages where you can search for individual or shared flats, talk to the landlords and arrange everything from the comfort of your home. Some of the most popular ones are Immobilien Scout 24, Immowelt and WG-Gesucht, but there are many others.

In addition, you can also choose to rent a flat through a real estate agency, which can make things much easier, but you also have to pay a fee for this service.

After you have found your place, all that you must do is pretty simple: you just have to arrange an appointment with your landlord, submit all the documents and simply get the keys for your apartment!

  1. What’s the usual cost of renting a flat in Germany?

This totally depends on the German city where you’re planning to stay. However, average prices are normally set per square meter. The most expensive cities to live in Germany are Munich, Hamburg and Cologne, where apartments right in the city can range from 1.500 to 2.500 euros a month. However, the further you move away from the city, the less you will pay. In the rest of cities, a one-bedroom apartment costs around 700 euros, which is very reasonable.

When you rent an apartment, you have to pay a deposit equal to three months’ worth of rent. Additionally, utilities are typically not included in the rent. Make sure that the rental agreement specifies this. Kaltmiete or “cold rent” refers to a property that does not include heating nor utilities in the rent. On the other hand, a Warmmiete includes heating costs and all the other expenses.

Moreover, most apartments are unfurnished and you are in charge of providing the furniture. We know that this can get quite expensive, which is why we suggest renting furniture. Renting your furniture can be an easy way to save a lot of money, and the best part is that if you decide to change your apartment or leave the city, you won’t have to worry about re-selling everything.

All things being said, we have gone through the whole list of what you have to do to rent a place in Germany. Yes, we know – it’s easier than it seems! We hope that this article made you feel less stressed about renting a flat in the country. If you’re patient enough, you will find the best home for you. Good luck on your search!

Get in touch

Loading

Fields marked with an * are required.

Testimonials

I think that would be a great initiative and an added value service for expats like myself.

Leonardo

What a great idea to set up a website for English-speaking ex-pat's in Munich to help with everyday challenges.

Loana

I am looking forward to your services in the mentioned topics in the survey.

Surya

Sounds exciting and we would definitely use it for a myriad of reasons. Particularly as we are getting ready to move to Germering and require all of these services. Specifically, sometimes it is hard finding doctors who speak English. And both Cecilia and I work with auslanders who do not speak German, either (and would as well be interested).

Melody